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CONTRIBUTED PHOTO The David Bromberg Quintet, 7:30 p.m. June 14, Musikfest Cafe, ArtsQuest Center, SteelStacks, 101 Founders Way, Bethlehem CONTRIBUTED PHOTO The David Bromberg Quintet, 7:30 p.m. June 14, Musikfest Cafe, ArtsQuest Center, SteelStacks, 101 Founders Way, Bethlehem

David Bromberg Quintet in Bethlehem concert

Wednesday, June 10, 2015 by ERIN FERGUSON Special to The Press in Focus

The David Bromberg Quintet returns to the Lehigh Valley for a concert at 7:30 p.m. June 14, Musikfest Cafe, ArtsQuest Center, SteelStacks, 101 Founders Way, Bethlehem. He has performed there previously, including in 2013

Joining him on stage will be Bob Taylor, bass; Mark Cosgrove, guitar and mandolin, Nate Grower, fiddle, and Josh Kanusky, drums.

In concert, Bromberg hopes to transport the audience to a different level of musical experience.

"I want to take them out of where they are and put them somewhere else," says Bromberg in a phone interview.

Bromberg says he has no prepared set list. He literally goes on stage and plays what works, what he feels in the moment. By starting a song, his band knows where it's going and takes it from there.

"People may think it's not their cup of tea, but they will be surprised," Bromberg says.

Bromberg started playing guitar at age 13. He enrolled in the musicology program at Columbia University. He began playing at coffeehouses and clubs where he learned by watching other performers. His mentor was the Rev. Gary Davis.

Bromberg backed up Tom Paxton, Jerry Jeff Walker and Rosalie Sorrels. He became the guy who was sought after throughout the industry, ultimately recording and playing on hundreds of records by artists, including Bob Dylan, Link Wray, Ringo Starr, Willie Nelson and Carly Simon.

During the past 23 years, Bromberg has concentrated on constructing and creating violins.

"Guitars are simple instruments, the construction, not playing them. But the violin has a lot of history," Bromberg says. "They are constructed more complexly than the guitar."

He got intrigued by the history of violins when he saw a guy pick up a violin and determine exactly who made it.

"It's not easy. You can't identify anything you haven't seen before. You can't tell who made it without the knowledge," says Bromberg.

Bromberg's latest recording is "David Bromberg: Archive Recordings, Volume 1, 1979-1979."