Catasauqua Press

Thursday, October 19, 2017
Nathan Scholl sports beautiful, blond curls while letting his hair grow long. Nathan Scholl sports beautiful, blond curls while letting his hair grow long.
He plans to donate his hair to be made into a wig for cancer patients.CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS He plans to donate his hair to be made into a wig for cancer patients.CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS

Grandmother inspires Catasauqua boy

Wednesday, April 12, 2017 by MARK RECCEK Special to The Press in Local News

Nathan Scholl grows and donates his hair for cancer patient wigs

Nathan Scholl, 9, of Catasauqua, wanted to do something special to honor the memory of his grandmother, Janet Armao, who passed away from advanced-stage lung cancer April 26, 2015.

So, the Sheckler Elementary School student decided to grow his hair out and have his long, flowing blond tresses donated to an organization that makes wigs for cancer patients.

Armao had lived in Catasauqua with Nathan, his mother, Renee, father, Robert, and sister, Gileon, during the last three years of her life while she was battling cancer.

Nathan said he donated his hair because his grandmother went bald from the cancer treatments.

“I donated my hair so people who are bald from cancer can have a wig,” he said. “My nana told me she wanted some of my hair, and this is how they make the wigs for people like her.”

Nathan’s mother said everyone seemed to love Nathan’s hair, often complimenting him on it. According to Renee, one night her mother asked if she could have some of Nathan’s hair.

“She had a little wrap over her head because she was bald from the chemo,” Renee said. “Nathan told her he couldn’t do that. She explained that he sure could. So, we both told him how people who are sick like her get the wigs like the one she got at the hospital.”

Renee said Nathan wanted his donated hair to go to both adults and children and that the recipients would not be charged for the wigs. After some research, Renee said, the family found Pantene Beautiful Lengths, which met Nathan’s requirements.

Although Nathan was not teased specifically by others while he was letting his hair grow, he said a few strangers thought he was a girl due to the length of his hair.

“It made me a little bit angry,” he said.

According to Nathan, he wore a ponytail on a few occasions, at the recommendation of his mother. The purpose, he said, was to keep his hair out of his face.

Nathan is currently involved in Cub Scouts, is learning karate and plays the drums. He also plans on joining 4-H for his rabbit, Brownie.

The simple things are what he remembers and enjoyed most about spending time with his grandmother.

“I enjoyed watching TV with her,” he said. “She loved watching Monster Jam and NAS- CAR with me. She also liked watching ‘Real Steal’ with me. My nana went camping with us, too. She also liked to get delicious treats with me — like ice cream.”

Renee Scholl is proud of her son.

“The best part is, even after being called a girl by mistake, many times, he wants to donate again,” she said.