Catasauqua Press

Friday, June 23, 2017
CONTRIBUTED photoCatasauqua resident Eugenia Emert demonstrates some quilt-making skills June 4 on the opening day of the quilt show at the George Taylor House. CONTRIBUTED photoCatasauqua resident Eugenia Emert demonstrates some quilt-making skills June 4 on the opening day of the quilt show at the George Taylor House.
CONTRIBUTED photoA quilt created by Emert is draped on display near a fireplace in the historic house. CONTRIBUTED photoA quilt created by Emert is draped on display near a fireplace in the historic house.
CONTRIBUTED photoKaren Haas, gift shop manager at the George Taylor House, gets the shop ready for visitors. CONTRIBUTED photoKaren Haas, gift shop manager at the George Taylor House, gets the shop ready for visitors.
CONTRIBUTED photoAlso featured June 4 is a visit by Mary Todd Lincoln impersonator Linda Minarik. CONTRIBUTED photoAlso featured June 4 is a visit by Mary Todd Lincoln impersonator Linda Minarik.
This quilt was created in 1980 by local quilting enthusiasts who called themselves the Crazy Quilters of Catasauqua.PRESS PHOTO BY PAUL CMIL This quilt was created in 1980 by local quilting enthusiasts who called themselves the Crazy Quilters of Catasauqua.PRESS PHOTO BY PAUL CMIL

Quilts on display at historic house

Wednesday, June 14, 2017 by paul cmil Special to The Press in Local News

June 4 saw the opening of the first-ever quilt show at the George Taylor House. The quilts, combined with a session listening to the reminiscences of Mary Todd Lincoln, portrayed by Linda Minarik, made for a delightful afternoon on a cool, rainy weekend day.

Minarik gave a marvelous rendition of Mrs. Lincoln. Historians have found the woman to have had a colorful and strange lifestyle in and out of the White House.

“This is a great venue for quilts,” said the house manager Jean Decker, who helped organize the event. “Women crafted quilts to tell a story about their life. Quilting bees were one of the premier social occasions during the long winter months.”

Space to display quilts inside the George Taylor House is limited, and surrounding communities that have quilting organizations did not want to display their quilts outdoors.

One of the quilts on display was from the Crazy Quilters of Catasauqua. It was completed in 1980.

“Most of the women who worked on this quilt are deceased,” Decker said. “It is a great remembrance of their organization.”

Many of the quilts will remain on display at the George Taylor House through the next planned event, the reading of the Declaration of Independence July 4. There is some talk of maintaining a continuous display, but the organizers want to see how the public reacts to the quilts on display.

Eugenia Emert and Cathy Mouer supplied most of the quilts from their collections. Both women are avid quilters. The quilts are available for sale.