Catasauqua Press

Tuesday, September 25, 2018
Press photos by Paul CmilChristopher Black reads the Declaration of Independence at the George Taylor House, Lehigh and Poplar streets, Catasauqua, July 4. Several Loyalists disapprove of this act of treason against the king. Press photos by Paul CmilChristopher Black reads the Declaration of Independence at the George Taylor House, Lehigh and Poplar streets, Catasauqua, July 4. Several Loyalists disapprove of this act of treason against the king.
Payton and her sister Jordan Arifaj take a break to pose in their patriotic outfits. Payton signed her pledge as a Patriot. Payton and her sister Jordan Arifaj take a break to pose in their patriotic outfits. Payton signed her pledge as a Patriot.
Press photos by Paul CmilLisa Knoll signs her Loyalist card to the approval of those supporting the king. Press photos by Paul CmilLisa Knoll signs her Loyalist card to the approval of those supporting the king.
Catasauqua native Gunnery Sgt. Kenneth Serfass presents his Marine Corps Antebellum Band for the reading of the Declaration of Independence July 4 at the George Taylor House, Catasauqua. Catasauqua native Gunnery Sgt. Kenneth Serfass presents his Marine Corps Antebellum Band for the reading of the Declaration of Independence July 4 at the George Taylor House, Catasauqua.

Catty celebrates Fourth of July

Wednesday, July 11, 2018 by Paul Cmil Special to The Press in Local News

Declaration of Independence read, band plays at George Taylor House

The July 4 reading of the Declaration of Independence at the George Taylor House, Lehigh and Poplar streets, Catasauqua, has grown from a simple recitation to a dynamic portrayal of the event by Christopher Black and the Bachmann Players.

Actors, dressed in period costume, portrayed the Tories and the Patriots with the Loyalists crying treason at each paragraph. It is fun and entertaining.

Audiences are held in rapt attention. What is sometimes overlooked is the logic and the reasoning behind why the declaration was written. It is celebrated because the American forefathers stood up to the British, because the British unnecessarily burdened the people with taxes without consent, because the British took to American homes to quarter troops without compensatory payment and because the British did not allow the laws passed in the new world to be enforced.

It is especially noticeable that a document written almost 250 years ago is still celebrated today.

Catasauqua American Legion Post 215 provided the traditional rifle salute, and the continental militia exercised its muskets. Gunnery Sgt. Kenneth Serfass brought his Marine Corps Antebellum Band to play patriotic tunes.

At this ceremony, just like the one in 1776, you had to make a choice — Loyalist or Patriot. You signed a paper declaring your choice, which would serve as your passport to patriotic gatherings.

The weather was hot and humid just like at the first reading those many years ago.

The latest addition to the festivities, welcome on a hot humid day, is cool alcoholic refreshments at Taylor House Brewing Company, across from the George Taylor House. They had food at the event as well.