Catasauqua Press

Tuesday, November 19, 2019
PRESS PHOTO BY ED COURRIERNational Museum of Industrial History Education coordinator Kitsa Behringer with paper created by a working model of a Rice, Barton, and Fales Fourdrinier papermaking machine. Copyright - © Ed Courrier PRESS PHOTO BY ED COURRIERNational Museum of Industrial History Education coordinator Kitsa Behringer with paper created by a working model of a Rice, Barton, and Fales Fourdrinier papermaking machine. Copyright - © Ed Courrier

National Museum Of Industrial History offers printing, paper-making workshops

Friday, August 17, 2018 by Ed Courrier Special to The Press Bethlehem’s National Museum of Industrial History is offering two workshops on printing and paper-making as part of the “Hot Off The Press: Printing And Papermaking” exhibit. in Focus

National Museum of Industrial History Education coordinator Kitsa Behringer says workshop participants will enjoy a hands-on experience while learning the art of making paper by hand and machine; setting type; printing on a hand-fed, foot-powered press; and bookbinding.

Paper-making expert Tom Necker joins master printer Bob Mueller and bookbinding expert Ulla Warcholl to supervise the “apprentice printers” in the labor-intensive processes.

During each three-hour session, while utilizing vintage artifacts from the “Hot Off The Press” exhibit, attendees will be taught the history of printing and learn how industrialization dramatically changed the industry.

Workshop participants will create a sheet of paper by hand. A hand-turned press for binding books will be used for paper-making.

Attendees can compare that process with making an eight-inch-wide roll of paper on a working model of a Fourdrinier endless-web paper machine built by Rice, Barton, and Fales in 1933, which is on loan from the Franklin Institute.

“Finally, you will be folding and sewing paper into the shape of an actual book to get the experience of what it was like to actually have to sew books together,” says Behringer.

“Eventually, they will walk out of here with a book with the covers they printed, paper that they helped make, the pages they folded and sewed. You walk out with a finished product,” Behringer says.

The first session, 1 p.m. - 4 p.m. Aug. 19 is geared towards youths (minimum age suggested is 10) and family instruction. There is a charge per person.

The second session, 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. Aug. 23, is focused more for older youths and adults. There is a charge per person.

Registration is required for both sessions. Museum members receive a 10 percent session discount.

“Hot Off The Press: Printing And Papermaking,” which continues through Oct. 31, features printed materials like a leaf from “Liber Chronicarum” (“Nuremberg Chronicle”), published in 1493; the Christopher Sauer Bible, printed in 1743 by Benjamin Franklin, and the Ephrata Cloister “The Martyr’s Mirror,” circa 1748-49, the largest book printed in Colonial America.

On display are working antique printing presses that visitors can use to print take-home mementos, a Mergenthaler Linotype machine, Nolan proof press, Hamilton imposing table, and two mosaics from the former Bethlehem Steel Corp. Printery.

National Museum Of Industrial History, 602 E. Second St., Bethlehem. Museum hours: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Wednesday - Sunday, Closed Monday and Tuesday. nmih.org; 610-694-6644