Catasauqua Press

Monday, December 17, 2018
Above: Kim Brubaker, president of Main Streets, presents an appreciation plaque to artist Denton Burrows at the dedication of the borough’s new mural Nov. 10. Above: Kim Brubaker, president of Main Streets, presents an appreciation plaque to artist Denton Burrows at the dedication of the borough’s new mural Nov. 10.
Left: The “Iron Worker” mural inspired residents to come out to the dedication ceremony. A reception was held at 415 Front St., where Burrows displayed renditions of some of his other art works.PRESS PHOTOS BY PaUL CMIL Left: The “Iron Worker” mural inspired residents to come out to the dedication ceremony. A reception was held at 415 Front St., where Burrows displayed renditions of some of his other art works.PRESS PHOTOS BY PaUL CMIL

Main Streets group dedicates mural

Wednesday, November 28, 2018 by PAUL CMIL Special to The Press in Local News

The mural on the side of Catasauqua Community Food Bank, 527 Front St., had a formal dedication ceremony Nov. 10. Main Streets, Catasauqua’s local business organization, contracted locally trained but internationally known artist Denton Burrows for the mural.

Kimberly Brubaker, president of Main Streets, viewed local artworks on Southside Bethlehem and selected Burrows for his innovative approach to public art.

Burrows classifies himself as a professional street artist and illustrator. On Catasauqua’s “Iron Worker” mural, he investigated the culture and history of the borough. He incorporated that history into his style.

Burrows admits his style is not appreciated by everyone. The mural is considered somewhat controversial.

He started his firm Dripped On Productions in New York City. He was active in the street art scene and saw an opportunity to provide businesses with artistic services ranging from logos to nightclub designs.

In 2016, he partnered with another NYC-based artist and formed a traveling artist program — Dripped On The Road. The goal was to enhance the visual atmosphere of communities through public art. The program gathers resident artists and heads out across the country, camping at local sites while painting murals for businesses. In two years, the seven resident artists traveled 15,000 miles and created 50 murals.

In 2018, Burrows partnered with Trellis Arch and traveled to Haiti to paint murals on schools and deliver supplies. In October, Burrows and his artists were back on the road again, painting 23 murals in 29 days.

“Public art has the power to inspire and bring people together,” he said.

Street artists maintain public murals are a natural evolution of their art. There is no museum fee to see public art. It only needs a blank wall as a canvas.

Burrows complemented the Catasauqua community on its hospitality. He mentioned comments from local residents inspired him. The building that houses the food bank is owned by John Landi, who encouraged the artist and his mural design.