Catasauqua Press

Wednesday, November 13, 2019
PRESS PHOTOS BY STEPHEN ALTHOUSEMary Bach, a consumer advocate with AARP Pennsylvania, waves a red flag during a presentation to senior citizens at the Scam Jam presentation May 20 at Country Meadows Retirement Community, Bethlehem Township. Copyright - Copyright 2009 PRESS PHOTOS BY STEPHEN ALTHOUSEMary Bach, a consumer advocate with AARP Pennsylvania, waves a red flag during a presentation to senior citizens at the Scam Jam presentation May 20 at Country Meadows Retirement Community, Bethlehem Township. Copyright - Copyright 2009
Seniors listen intently as Bach details different scams and how to avoid them. Copyright - Copyright 2009 Seniors listen intently as Bach details different scams and how to avoid them. Copyright - Copyright 2009
Terry Houck, assistant district attorney of Northampton County, informs senior citizens how to report scams to authorities. Copyright - Copyright 2009 Terry Houck, assistant district attorney of Northampton County, informs senior citizens how to report scams to authorities. Copyright - Copyright 2009
An AARP table provides seniors with information to combat becoming victims of fraud. Copyright - Copyright 2009 An AARP table provides seniors with information to combat becoming victims of fraud. Copyright - Copyright 2009

Presentation teaches seniors how to avoid possible scams

Wednesday, June 5, 2019 by STEPHEN ALTHOUSE Special to The Press in Local News

There’s an adage — if something sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

That was the message imparted to attendees of a program called Scam Jam: Fight Back held May 20 at Country Meadows Retirement Community, Bethlehem Township. The event, sponsored by AARP Pennsylvania and Country Meadows, was designed to help seniors protect themselves from frauds and scams.

“Remember, it’s your money, and some people will do anything they can to take it,” said Mary Bach, a consumer advocate who leads AARP Pennsylvania’s all volunteer Consumer Issues Task Force.

Bach disseminated stories about various frauds and scams, many coming from phone calls or through computer messages. While the scams were diverse, the tactics were similar — deception and manipulation of the victim’s emotions.

“It’s important for you to think,” she told audience members. “If something doesn’t seem right to you, it is a red flag moment.”

To illustrate the point, Bach waved a red flag tied to a stick.

She told stories about various phone scams. One, called the grandparents scam, typically involves a phone call in the middle of the night by someone pretending to be a grandchild in legal complications needing money to avoid prison time. Another hustle involves a sweepstakes ploy. For example, a potential victim receives a phone call saying they’ve won one of three prizes — money, a new car or a desk storage system.

“We all understand money and a new car,” Bach said.

But invariably the “winner” always wins the desk storage system. Bach relayed the story of one woman who was told she would receive her prize after sending $89 to a P.O. box. The woman did, and a few days later, she received a small box to hold pencils, pens and paper clips as her desk storage system. List price, about $1.

In retrospect, she said, it seems ridiculous that anyone would fall for that. But with enough sweet talking, manipulating and outright lying, scammers con enough people to make money.

“It’s no less a crime than if someone stuck a gun into you and said ‘give me your money,’” said Terry Houck, first deputy attorney of Northampton County.

Houck said the district attorney’s office takes these crimes seriously and will, to the extent of the law, seek prosecution and punishment for those involved.

“We’re trying to protect you,” he told the audience. “But we can’t do anything if you don’t report it.”

There are many reasons why a senior citizen victim would not report a crime, Bach noted. Often, they are embarrassed they were taken advantage of. Other times, they are worried family members and friends will criticize them and question whether they are, in the words of Bach, “losing it” mentally.

“None of us want to be thought of as that,” she said.

Bach and Houck said they hoped their presentations mollified some of the stigma associated with being a victim.

“There isn’t too small a case,” Houck said. “If you paid for a service, then you are entitled to a service.”