Catasauqua Press

Sunday, August 18, 2019
PRESS PHOTOS BY PAUL CMILA Schweizer 269C helicopter is inspected after it crashed Aug. 11 on its approach to Lehigh Valley International Airport. The pilot and a passenger were aboard. PRESS PHOTOS BY PAUL CMILA Schweizer 269C helicopter is inspected after it crashed Aug. 11 on its approach to Lehigh Valley International Airport. The pilot and a passenger were aboard.
Personnel inspect the helicopter to determine the cause of the crash at 981 Postal Road. Minor damage, but nothing structural, was caused to the exterior of the building. Personnel inspect the helicopter to determine the cause of the crash at 981 Postal Road. Minor damage, but nothing structural, was caused to the exterior of the building.
The helicopter is loaded onto a transport vehicle for further investigation. The helicopter is loaded onto a transport vehicle for further investigation.

Helicopter crashes on approach to airport

Wednesday, August 14, 2019 by PAUL CMIL Special to The Press in Local News

Pilot, passenger injured as aircraft hits building

A light two-passenger helicopter crashed Aug. 11 on its approach to Lehigh Valley International Airport.

The Schweizer 269C helicopter was rented from Ace Pilot Training School, based at the airport.

The crash occurred approximately 2:45 p.m. From the situation on the ground, the helicopter appears to have clipped the top of the building at 981 Postal Road during its approach and crashed on the front lawn.

Both the pilot and the passenger were transported to St. Luke’s Hospital with minor injuries, according to details provided by Han-Le-Co Assistant Fire Chief Kevin Harwick. Other news sources have reported one of the people involved in the crash may have sustained more serious injuries.

The building owner at 981 Postal Road inspected the area and determined that there was no structural damage. The building was open for business the following day.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash, and details will be released as they are verified.

According to Jim Peters, of the FAA, the National Transportation Safety Board will determine the probable cause of the accident. The NTSB investigates every aircraft incident.

Several hours after the crash, the mangled aircraft was loaded on a transport vehicle and headed to an airport hangar for further analysis by the NTSB.