Catasauqua Press

Friday, November 22, 2019
Battleship naval shells during World War II were made in Coplay.Photos courtesy of David Uhle and Larry Oberly Battleship naval shells during World War II were made in Coplay.Photos courtesy of David Uhle and Larry Oberly
A variety of machine parts used by the U.S. Navy were made in Coplay. A variety of machine parts used by the U.S. Navy were made in Coplay.
Large naval equipment was made in the Coplay plant and sent off during World War II. Large naval equipment was made in the Coplay plant and sent off during World War II.
Small parts like these threads were manufactured in the Coplay Cement Company machine shop for the war effort. Small parts like these threads were manufactured in the Coplay Cement Company machine shop for the war effort.
High-quality pumps were sent to the U.S. Navy after being made in Coplay. High-quality pumps were sent to the U.S. Navy after being made in Coplay.
After the war, Coplay Cement Company was able to make improvements to the new crushing plant in 1948. After the war, Coplay Cement Company was able to make improvements to the new crushing plant in 1948.

Remembering: Coplay Cement and World War II

Wednesday, August 21, 2019 by ED PANY Curator, Atlas Cement Company Memorial Museum in Columns

When the United States entered World War II, the War Production Board was formed to mobilize American industry for war production. Donald Nelson, a former Sears executive, was appointed the director. He possessed unlimited power to head the war effort.

The factories of America were now manufacturing tanks, planes and anything needed to win the war. The machine shops of our local cement companies worked 24-hour shifts to support the war effort.

Ms. Gwynn Krempasky provided us photographs never seen by our loyal readers. Mr. David Uhle, vice president of the Coplay Cement Manufacturing Company, took these rare photographs during World War II in the Coplay Cement Company machine shop. Mr. Uhle was the executive vice president of Coplay Cement for 36 years — nine years at the Universal Atlas Cement Company in Northampton.

These photographs take us back to 1941-45.

While sons of cement workers fought with courage in World War II, on the home front, their fathers produced the equipment needed to support them.