Catasauqua Press

Saturday, January 25, 2020
Jackie Russ-Harford, owner of Fossil’s Last Stand, 429 Race St., Catasauqua, and her daughter Savanna enjoy the chili cook-off Nov. 2 at Fossil’s. The event benefited Feline Urban Rescue and Rehabilitation and No Kill of the Lehigh Valley.Press photos by Paul Cmil Jackie Russ-Harford, owner of Fossil’s Last Stand, 429 Race St., Catasauqua, and her daughter Savanna enjoy the chili cook-off Nov. 2 at Fossil’s. The event benefited Feline Urban Rescue and Rehabilitation and No Kill of the Lehigh Valley.Press photos by Paul Cmil
Carisa Locher and Kathy Yialamas, with FURR, dish out chili samples to guests. Carisa Locher and Kathy Yialamas, with FURR, dish out chili samples to guests.
Diane Davison, with No Kill of the Lehigh Valley, greets guests at the event. Diane Davison, with No Kill of the Lehigh Valley, greets guests at the event.
Ed Pencil, Arlana Carrocher and Terri Trigiani show their tickets for the 50/50 drawing. The pot hit $400. Ed Pencil, Arlana Carrocher and Terri Trigiani show their tickets for the 50/50 drawing. The pot hit $400.
A basket social was sponsored by local companies. A basket social was sponsored by local companies.

Chili cook-off another success

Tuesday, December 31, 2019 by PAUL CMIL Special to The Press in Local News

On Nov. 2, Fossil’s Last Stand, 429 Race St., Catasauqua, held its annual chili cook-off. The event is always well attended, and this year was no exception.

The proceeds from the event go to Feline Urban Rescue and Rehabilitation and No Kill of the Lehigh Valley. Both organizations rescue wayward animals, give needed vaccinations, tend to their health and then adopt them out.

Joann Carty came into the party a little late but adopted out 22 animals at an event at Petco.

“That makes over 400 FURR (pets) adopted this year,” said Kathy Yialamas, one of the organization’s frequent volunteers.

Diane Davison has been involved in the Lehigh Valley with animal rescues for decades.

“For us, this is a huge benefit. We benefit, and so does Fossil’s. Plus, we get stray animals adopted into homes,” she said.

Davison started the trap, neuter and release programs in the area.

“We capture the strays, mainly cats, and get them their shots and neuter them. We clip their ear, so we know they have been through the program,” she said.

Dogs are handled differently because they can be harmful when allowed to run free. Cats are normally only just a nuisance, and breeding causes problems. People do feed strays, so they continue to roam around. The goal of TNR is to control breeding and reduce the population of strays.

“Our goal is to ultimately get the strays adopted,” Davison said.

Both organizations found a sponsor with Jackie Russ-Harford, the owner of Fossil’s.

“It is a great organization, and we sponsored them for seven years now, and we want to continue to do it,” she said.

The place is always crowded, and each of the specialty chili crocks are sponsored by locals. As an added treat, there are gift baskets available.

There are at least 30 pots available for tasting, and the entrance fee allows you to sample as many different chili recipes as possible. They range the gauntlet from mild to hot to very spicy. The base can be chicken, beef or veggie, with red or white sauce.

The event is always held in the first week of November. You can determine your chili preference for next year’s event.