Catasauqua Press

Friday, July 3, 2020

Remembering: Weaversville today

Wednesday, June 24, 2020 by ED PANY Curator, Atlas Cement Company Memorial Museum in Columns

In today’s column, Larry Oberly shares some current photographs of the Weaversville area, and we relate the properties to the history of the village.

The former Howertown Rose Nursery was a dairy farm. Mr. Samuel Schrantz purchased the farm and converted a portion of the property into a popular retail rose garden. Full of energy, he was also employed at Universal Atlas Portland Cement Company, in charge of its landscaping. The plant manager, “Butch” Boucher, wanted the plant grounds to have an attractive lawn and shrubbery landscape.

Remembering: Weaversville of my youth

Wednesday, June 10, 2020 by ED PANY Curator, Atlas Cement Company Memorial Museum in Columns

Seventy years ago, I spent much of the summer on William Smith’s farm in Weaversville. My father, Anthony, was an immigrant from Austria. My first job was on the farm. The family’s main farm was in East Allen Township.

The farm was sold, so Willie moved to a small farm in Weaversville. My father would leave the farm when he was hired by Universal Atlas Cement Company but would also help on the farm when needed.

Remembering: Weaversville World War II memorial

Wednesday, May 27, 2020 by ED PANY Curator, Atlas Cement Company Memorial Museum in Columns

In our visit to Weaversville, I checked the World War II memorial honoring the men and women who served the nation in World War II — a memorial that is rarely visited.

The bronze plaque honoring 61 veterans is on the grounds of St. John’s United Church of Christ, Howertown. The roll of names lists former residents of Weaversville and the rural area surrounding the village. The area, at the time, was sparsely populated.

Remembering: Visiting with Margie Jenkins

Wednesday, May 13, 2020 by ED PANY Curator, Atlas Cement Company Memorial Museum in Columns

Today, Larry Oberly and this writer are concluding our interview with Susan Jenkins and her mother, Margie, a descendant of Samuel Weaver, whose father founded the village of Weaversville.

Margie is a fascinating lady whose family roots go back to the founding of the United States. Full of determination and energy, at age 51, she applied for graduate school at the University of Houston.

Remembering: Weaversville after the Civil War

Wednesday, April 29, 2020 by ED PANY Curator, Atlas Cement Company Memorial Museum in Columns

The large brick structure, now the Weaversville Hotel, was built by Samuel Weaver and was occupied by the large Weaver family.

The family remained the most prominent family in the village. Their tannery processed hides into useful leather products. There was a grist mill, where farmers patiently waited until their wheat and corn were ground into flour and feed for their livestock.

Remembering: A review of the 1858 Weaversville Academy catalog

Wednesday, April 15, 2020 by ED PANY Curator, Atlas Cement Company Memorial Museum in Columns

Today, we continue our visit to the Weaversville Academy on Weaversville Road in East Allen Township.

Our guide is an 1858 catalog from Amanda Weaver. Michael and Samuel Weaver, Amanda’s grandfather and father, respectively, were two of the founders of Weaversville and Weaversville Academy.

Ms. Susan Jenkins Weaver, family historian, has graciously shared this research for our readers.

CEMENT WORKER OF THE MONTH

Wednesday, April 8, 2020 by ED PANY Curator, Atlas Cement Company Memorial Museum in Local News

Harold S. Balliet

Mr. Harold Balliet was reared in Coplay, graduating from Whitehall High School in 1984. A co-op student, he worked at Laneco, where his mother, Grace, was the deli manager. His wage was $4 an hour.

Upon graduation, he worked for a number of food distributors. Harold later worked for Eastern Industries, where he learned to operate quarry equipment.

His cement career started at Essroc, now Lehigh Heidelberg, in 1993.

Harold recalls, “I was hired by labor foreman Rick Gaston and soon was assigned to the quarry, where I could use my equipment skills.”

Remembering: Taking a look at the Weaversville Academy catalog

Wednesday, April 1, 2020 by ED PANY Curator, Atlas Cement Company Memorial Museum in Columns

In this column, Mr. Larry Oberly and this writer are enrolling in the Weaversville Academy on Weaversville Road, East Allen Township. The year is 1858. I hope we are accepted!

This rare 1858 academy catalog was a copy from Amanda Weaver. Michael and Samuel Weaver were two of the founders of the academy. Samuel was Amanda’s father.

Ms. Susan Jenkins Weaver, family researcher, graciously has shared this information with our readers. The land for the school was donated by the Weaver family.

Cement Worker of the Month

Wednesday, March 11, 2020 by ED PANY Curator, Atlas Cement Company Memorial Museum in Local News

Krista L. Karasek

Mrs. Krista L. Karasek was reared in Bangor, graduating from Bangor High School in 1996, where she was a member of the softball and field hockey teams. Both her father and uncle played Minor League Baseball.

She graduated from Allentown Business College and completed an internship at Hercules Buzzi Unicem.

Upon graduation, she was employed at Van Horn Association in Allentown for $8.25 an hour and later at Computer Management in Bath.

Remembering: The Weaver family and the Civil War

Wednesday, March 4, 2020 by ED PANY Curator, Atlas Cement Company Memorial Museum in Columns

In this column, Margie Jenkins, a descendant of the Weaver family, and her daughter Susan Jenkins take us back to Weaversville. The year — 1850.

Family members were housed in a number of buildings on the property. Samuel Weaver had eight brothers and sisters and eight children (four died in infancy), plus his wife, Maria Magdalene Fatzinger Weaver, so Samuel decided to build a new home.