Catasauqua Press

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Healthy Geezer: Salmonella infection

Friday, September 22, 2017 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. What exactly is Salmonella and how can I avoid it?

Salmonella are microscopic living creatures that spread from the feces of people or animals. Salmonella can be found in raw poultry, eggs, beef, and unwashed produce. Any food can become contaminated. Salmonella is the most common cause of foodborne illness in the United States.

Salmonellosis is an infection of the intestinal tract from the bacteria. Symptoms of the infection, which usually last four days to a week, include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, fever and headache.

Healthy Geezer: steroids concerns

Friday, September 8, 2017 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. I’ve been reading about athletes using steroids to build themselves up. Do these drugs work for older men?

First some background on steroids. There are two types of steroids: corticosteroids and anabolic steroids. Corticosteroids, such as cortisone and prednisone, are drugs that help control inflammation. Anabolic steroids, such as androstenedione or andro, are substances that can help the body make muscle.

Healthy Geezer: radiation symptoms

Friday, September 1, 2017 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. I’ve been reading about “dirty bombs” that spread radiation. They can kill by giving you radiation sickness. What exactly is this?

Radiation sickness is an illness caused by too much exposure to radiation. How ill you become depends on the dose and the rate of exposure. Exposure to low-dose radiation, such as X-ray examinations, does not cause radiation sickness.

Healthy Geezer: skin care

Friday, August 25, 2017 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. Do wrinkle creams work?

The American Academy of Dermatology says that over-the-counter wrinkle creams do little or nothing to reverse wrinkles.

However, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved prescription tretinoin cream to treat aging skin. In addition, the FDA has also approved lasers for skin treatment.

Tretinoin cream, which is a vitamin A derivative, is sold under the brand names Altinac, Atralin, Avita, Renova, Retin A Micro Gel, Retin-A and Tretin-X.

Healthy Geezer: carrots and cataracts

Friday, August 18, 2017 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. Does drinking carrot juice help with cataracts?

A cataract is a clouding of the lens, the clear part of the eye that helps focus images like the lens in a camera. Cataracts can blur images and discolor them. Most cataracts are related to aging. More than half of Americans over age 65 have a cataract.

I suspect this reader’s question was inspired by the common belief that carrots are good for your eyes. And carrots are good for your eyes.

Healthy Geezer: Fast heart rhythms

Saturday, July 29, 2017 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. My father was diagnosed with SVT? Is that bad?

SVT stands for supraventricular tachycardia, an abnormally-fast heart rhythm. It is not usually dangerous. SVT is one of many types of arrhythmia. An arrhythmia is a problem with the speed or rhythm of the heartbeat.

Most arrhythmias are harmless. Even serious arrhythmias can be treated successfully. Most people with arrhythmias are able to live healthy lives.

Healthy Geezer: Sweating

Friday, July 21, 2017 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. I’m a healthy 71-year-old woman and I sweat a lot. I was wondering if it’s something I should discuss with my doctor.

Heavy sweating, or perspiration, is normal if you are exercising, in a hot environment or you are nervous. It also happens during menopause.

Healthy people sweat, but the amount varies widely. Some people inherit heavy sweating, especially on their palms and the soles of their feet. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, excessive sweating affects about 8 million Americans.

Healthy Geezer: Food allergies symptoms

Friday, July 14, 2017 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. What are the most common food allergies?

Foods that produce most allergic reactions in adults include fish, shrimp, lobster, crab, peanuts, eggs and tree nuts such as walnuts and pecans. Common children’s allergic reactions are caused by eggs, milk, wheat and peanuts.

A true food allergy is an abnormal response by your immune system to certain foods. All reactions to foods are not allergies. When you have a reaction that doesn’t involve the immune system, this reaction is called food intolerance.